Cairo’s graffiti revolution

Source: cbsnews.com

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

n this Tuesday, March 13, 2012, photo, a boy watches an Egyptian female artist and activist at work on the “No Walls Street” during the graffiti campaign to paint a reproduction of the streets behind them and targeted the concrete blocks walls in downtown Cairo, Egypt. After Egypt’s ruling military sealed off streets around Cairo’s Tahrir Square with walls of imposing concrete blocks, a group of artists decided to reopen the avenues on their own, in the public imagination, at least.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

 n this Thursday, March 22, 2012, photo, an Egyptian couple walks past a mural depicting military ruler Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, on the left side of the face and ousted president Hosni Mubarak, right side, with Arabic that reads, “who assigned you did not die, No for gas export to Israel, the revolution continues,” at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

This Sunday, March 25, 2012, combo image made from eight photos shows graffiti paintings depicting slain soccer fans that are part of a campaign carried out by activists following a soccer riot earlier this year with dozens of deaths, are seen on the streets of Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

A Friday, March 23, 2012 combo image made from two photos, logos of part of graffiti campaigns carried out by activists with Arabic that reads, from top to bottom, “parking is allowed only at the borders, I don’t believe in the military council” are seen on the streets of Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

An Egyptian protester passes by a graffiti in Arabic writing that reads, “Ultras is the straw that will break the backbone of the Military rule,” referring to Al-Ahly soccer club soccer fans who area called Ultras, during a rally denouncing Islamists domination of the 100-member panel that will write the country’s post-Mubarak constitution, in front of the People Council in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, March 28, 2012.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

This Sunday, March 25, 2012 photo shows graffiti with Arabic that reads “a message,” made by activists to support members of the Ultras, a group of avid politicized soccer fans, during an Ultras sit-in protest, unseen, at the Egyptian People’s Council in Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

This Saturday, March 24, 2012, combo image made from eight photos shows logos of part of the graffiti campaigns carried out by activists depicting activists and military officers are seen on the streets of Cairo, Egypt. Arabic on the logos reads, “Freedom for Ahmed Abu Doma, We get their rights or we die like them, Ahmed el-Mogi the rapist of our daughters, down with the military rule, you will not break me and silence is not for us.”

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

In this Wednesday, March 21, 2012, photo, an Egyptian couple walks under a mural depicting female activist Samira Ibrahim, who was forced to undergo a “virginity test” while in detention by the military, in Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

In this Wednesday, March 21, 2012, photo, graffiti depicting female activist Samira Ibrahim, who was forced to undergo a virginity test while in detention by the military, and Arabic that reads, “Ultras, paint the streets of Egypt,” is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

In this Wednesday, March 14, 2012, photo, a painted concrete block wall with Arabic that reads “down with the military rule,” is part of the graffiti campaign to paint a reproduction of the streets behind them and targeted the concrete blocks walls in downtown Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

In this Tuesday, March 13, 2012, photo, members of a traditional Egyptian musical band prepare to perform during a ceremony to celebrate the imaginary opening of the “No Walls Street” at the end of the graffiti campaign to paint a reproduction of the streets behind them and targeted the concrete blocks walls in downtown Cairo, Egypt.

Credit: AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

In this Tuesday, March 13, 2012, photo, an Egyptian boy rides his bike next to an artist working on the “No Walls Street” graffiti campaign to paint a reproduction of the streets behind them and targeted the concrete blocks walls in downtown Cairo, Egypt. After Egypt’s ruling military sealed off streets around Cairo’s Tahrir Square with walls of imposing concrete blocks, a group of artists decided to reopen the avenues on their own, in the public imagination, at least.

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